Posts Tagged ‘eye’

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A blind man has had his sight restored after pioneering surgery that involved implanting one of his teeth into his eye

October 10, 2013

Ian Tibbetts, 43, who first damaged his eye in an industrial accident when scrap metal ripped his cornea in six places, had his sight restored by the radical operation, chronicled in the new BBC documentary The Day I Got My Sight Back.

The surgery allowed Mr Tibbetts to see his four-year-old twin sons, Callum and Ryan, for the first time, a moment he describes as “ecstasy”.

The procedure, called osteo-odonto-keratoprothesis, or OOKP, was conducted by ophthalmic surgeon Christopher Liu at the Sussex Eye Hospital in Brighton, Sussex. Mr Tibbetts and his wife Alex agreed to the revolutionary surgery after all other options had failed, leaving Mr Tibbetts depressed and out of work.

The complex surgery is a two-part procedure. First, the tooth and part of the jaw are removed, and a lens is inserted into the tooth using a drill. The tooth and lens are then implanted under the eye socket. After a few months, once the tooth has grown tissues and developed a blood supply, comes the second step: part of the cornea is sliced open and removed and the tooth is stitched into the eye socket. Since the tooth is the patient’s own tissue, the body does not reject it.

VIA

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The Eye, the Brain, and What happens during Death Experience

July 24, 2013

Scout motto is “be prepared,” but it’s hard to be prepared for death, be it our own or a loved one’s. Too much is unknown about what dying feels like or what, if anything, happens after you die to ever feel truly ready. However, we do know a bit about the process that occurs in the days and hours leading up to a natural death, and knowing what’s going on may be helpful in a loved one’s last moments.

During the dying process, the body’s systems shut down. The dying person has less energy and begins to sleep more and more. The body is conserving the little energy it has, and as a result, needs less nourishment and sustenance. In the days (or sometimes weeks) before death, people eat and drink less. They may lose all interest in food and drink, and you shouldn’t force them to eat. In fact, pushing food or drink on a dying person could cause him or her to choke — at this point, it has become difficult to swallow and the mouth is very dry.

As the person takes in less food and drink, he or she will urinate less frequently and have fewer bowel movements. The person may also experience loss of bladder and bowel control. People who are dying may become confused, agitated or restless, which could be a result of the brain receiving less oxygen. It can be disconcerting and painful to hear a loved one so confused in his or her last days.

The skin will also show the effects of slowing circulation and less oxygen — the extremities, and later, the entire body, may be cool to the touch and may turn blue or light gray. Some skin may exhibit signs of mottling, which is reddish-blue blotchiness. As the person gets closer to death, it will become harder and harder to breathe. Respiration will be noisy and irregular; it will sometimes seem as if the person can’t breathe at all. When there’s fluid in the lungs, it can cause a sound known as the death rattle. It may be possible to alleviate the gurgling and congestion by raising the person’s head. If the dying person is experiencing pain, he or she will usually be given medications to manage it.

When we’re watching someone die, we may have a preconceived notion of how the person should handle death emotionally and spiritually. It’s important to remember that every person experiences dying differently. Some people have the need to say goodbye or to hear from another person before death, some don’t. Some people prefer to partake in religious rites, while others may remain silent until the end and pass away when everyone has left the room. Doctors and other professionals who manage end-of-life care advise loved ones to take their cues from the dying and avoid projecting their own desires or needs onto the person. They also urge loved ones to continue speaking comfortingly to a dying person — hearing may be one of the last things to go.

Clinical death occurs when the person’s heartbeat, breathing and circulation stop. Four to six minutes later, biological death occurs. That’s when brain cells begin to die from lack of oxygen, and resuscitation is impossible.

All Text via How Stuff Works. See Experiencing Death video THERE

Electrodes trigger out-of-body experience

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Gender Visual Dynamics

December 4, 2012

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Everyone knows that men and women tend to hold different views on certain things. However, new research by scientists from the University of Bristol and published in PLoS ONE indicates that this may literally be the case.

Researchers examined where men and women looked while viewing still images from films and pieces of art. They found that while women made fewer eye movements than men, those they did make were longer and to more varied locations.

These differences were largest when viewing images of people. With photos of heterosexual couples, both men and women preferred looking at the female figure rather than the male one. However, this preference was even stronger for women.

While men were only interested in the faces of the two figures, women’s eyes were also drawn to the rest of the bodies – in particular that of the female figure.

Felix Mercer Moss, PhD student in the Department of Computer Science who led the study, said: “The study represents the most compelling evidence yet that, despite occupying the same world, the viewpoints of men and women can, at times, be very different.

“Our findings have important implications for both past and future eye movement research together with future technological applications.”

Eye movements are a tool used to collect visual information, which then colors an individual’s perception of the world. Equally, when individuals have different interpretations of the world, this in turn affects the information they seek and, consequently, the places they look.

The researchers suggest that men and women look at different things because they interpret the world differently. The pictures preferred by women were the same pictures that produced the most distinct ‘looking patterns’. Similarly, the pictures with the largest scope for a difference in interpretation – those with people – also produced the largest differences between where men and women looked.

One perceptual sex difference in particular – women’s increased sensitivity to threat – may explain a further finding. People’s eyes are drawn to the most informative regions of an image while also being repelled from areas that carry possible threat or danger, for example the sun. Faces are a paradoxical example of a region that is both highly informative and potentially threatening, particularly if eye contact is made.

While men made direct eye contact with faces in the pictures; especially when primed to look for threat, women averted their gaze downward slightly towards the nose and mouth of these faces. The researchers claim that this may be due to women being more sensitive to the negative consequences of making direct eye contact and will, therefore, shift their gaze downward, towards the center of the face.

Research: University of Bristol. All text via EurekAlert

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Eye-drawings

November 3, 2012

Eye-drawings, «Augenzeichnungen», are drawings done directly with the eyes, without the slightest interference of the hands – the organ of perception being turned into the organ of expression. By means of technical aids (infrared-, video-, and computer- techniques) human eye movements are traced and digitized during the visual process of looking at something, so as to be able to do an ink-jet print out of these movements eventually. The body of works called Eye-drawings not only investigates the process of looking at everyday objects in the form of photographs or real three dimensional items, but primarily circles around issues of research and the visualization of abstract motives and processes e.g., time, reading, writing, drawing, light, and afterimage, culminating in the denial of the gaze: nothingness – the invisible is made visible by means of a trace.

Jochem Hendricks

Text and Image via Media Art Net

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Tissue engineering: The brainmaker

August 28, 2012

With his knack for knowing what stem cells want, Yoshiki Sasai has grown an eye and parts of a brain in a dish.

In December 2010, Robin Ali became suddenly excited by the usually mundane task of reviewing a scientific paper. “I was running around my room, waving the manuscript,” he recalls. The paper described how a clump of embryonic stem cells had grown into a rounded goblet of retinal tissue. The structure, called an optic cup, forms the back of the eye in a growing embryo. But this one was in a dish, and videos accompanying the paper showed the structure slowly sprouting and blossoming. For Ali, an ophthalmologist at University College London who has devoted two decades to repairing vision, the implications were immediate. “It was clear to me it was a landmark paper,” he says. “He has transformed the field.”

Excerpt of an article written by David Cyranoski, at Nature. Continue HERE

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0,1: Turn the light off by blinking.

July 31, 2012

An interactive installation based on Arduino.

The lights in the gallery are temporarily turned off whenever the person wearing the glasses blinks.

It all happens so fast that the person wearing the glasses does not even notice the change.

Via Michal Kohút

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The Telescopic Eye: New surgery turns Colorado woman’s damaged eye into a telescope

July 23, 2012

Dr. Starck Johnson cuts a small hole in the right eye of Doris Ekblad-Olson, 82, in preparation for Tuesday’s operation. Ekblad-Olson suffers from “wet” macular degeneration, where blood vessels are leaking and destroying central vision.

The pea-size telescopic device, called CentraSight, is placed behind the iris.

Dr. Starck Johnson, above, looks through a telescope as he stitches the cornea of Doris Ekblad-Olson’s right eye, visible on the overhead monitor. He implanted a pea-size telescope into her eye Tuesday at Sky Ridge Medical Center in Lone Tree.

Dr. Starck Johnson holds the miniature telescope before implanting it into the eye of 82-year-old Doris Ekblad-Olson.

Text and Image via The Denver Post