Posts Tagged ‘experimental’

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Chaosophy | Texts and Interviews 1972–1977 | By Félix Guattari

January 29, 2013

Chaosophy is an introduction to Félix Guattari’s groundbreaking theories of “schizo-analysis”: a process meant to replace Freudian interpretation with a more pragmatic, experimental, and collective approach rooted in reality. Unlike Freud, who utilized neuroses as his working model, Guattari adopted the model of schizophrenia—which he believed to be an extreme mental state induced by the capitalist system itself, and one that enforces neurosis as a way of maintaining normality. Guattari’s post-Marxist vision of capitalism provides a new definition not only of mental illness, but also of the micropolitical means for its subversion.

Chaosophy includes Guattari’s writings and interviews on the cinema (such as “Cinema Fou” and “The Poor Man’s Couch”), a group of texts on his collaborative work with Gilles Deleuze (including the appendix to the second edition of Anti-Oedipus, not available in the English edition), and his texts on homosexuality (including his “Letter to the Tribunal” addressing the French government’s censorship of the special gay issue of Recherches he edited, which earned him a fine for publishing “a detailed exposition of depravity and sexual deviations… the libidinous exhibition of a minority of perverts”). This expanded edition features a new introduction by François Dosse (author of a new biography of Guattari and Gilles Deleuze), along with a range of added essays—including “The Plane of Consistency,” “Machinic Propositions,” “Gangs in New York,” and “Three Billion Perverts on the Stand”—nearly doubling the contents of the original edition.

Text via MIT Press.

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The Vortex by Raumlabor

December 4, 2012

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We live in times of great turbulence. Movements that normally cannot be seen are now taking shape and happening unexpectedly. Things that appeared to be clear now become unclear. In the absence of external forces, friction within flows will self organize into a collection of so called irrotational vortices.

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The Todays Art Festival
in The Hague occurs in a critical moment in the political and cultural life of The Hague where multi-million-euro architectural projects are being approved alongside dramatic budget cuts to smaller cultural institutions. Following previous experiments, this contradiction led us to propose a structure for the festival entirely made out of discarded materials, a vortex structure expressing this idea of a natural force that sucks everything in its path. This space would serve as a meeting point/festival center on the Spuiplein, the major public square in the center of The Hague and heart of the festival.

Raumlaborberlin joined forces with local garbage architects Refunc in organizing materials and building the structure. By tapping in to The Hague’s material flows we managed to obtain 3 containers of pallets, which were temporarily diverted to our working site for six days before returning back into their own life cycle. These 3 containers are the equivalent of what the supplier collects each day. The vortex thus becomes a materialization and temporary solidification of the local material flows.

All text and Images via Raumlabor, a network of 8 trained architects who have come together in a collaborative work-structure developing an experimental architectural practice . See More HERE

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The Neurofeminist: Anne Jaap Jacobson interviewed by Richard Marshall

November 30, 2012

Anne Jaap Jacobson is the neurofeminist philosofunskster whose mind is setting fire to the boys’ club and putting the academy straight whilst doing edgy work in the philosophy of mind. Nuns have called her a ‘wicked girl’ but she’s one of the crazy-gang of experimental philosophers looking at bigotry, bias, cognitive neuroscience, naturalism, worrying about traditional philosophical approaches and wondering how to do things better. She’s considered Hume from a feminist perspective, brings a cross-disciplinary jive to the philosophical party and doesn’t think looking is like being given pictures. Her mind is a hive of ideas even though she worries that women are having to face too much resignation, bitterness, disillusionment and discouragement in philosophy and everywhere. Which makes her a seminal figure, and bodaciously groovy.

Read the interview HERE

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The Research and Destroy Department of Black Mountain College

November 21, 2012


For a brief moment the revolutionary ideas on art and living of Black Mountain College resonate in the spaces of W139. The work of more than 30 young conceptual artists meets in an experimental Wunderkammer and engages in a tactile dialogue creating a performative space.

THE RESEARCH AND DESTROY DEPARTMENT OF BLACK MOUNTAIN COLLEGE brings together a group of bricoleurs, conceptual artists whose work share the idea of collecting. The physical shape of the work is determined by the content of their own research. The gathering, or ensemble of different ideas in literary images tells a story, and stands close to the notion of anachronism. In the exhibition mostly three-dimensional works will be presented, forming a dynamic parcours, as a forest of metonymic sculptures and images. The displaying of this anti-digital show will create new conceptual reflections between the different works. With 30+ artists the exhibition spaces of W139 will take on the temporal form of a giant cabin of curiosities, a physical embodiment of knowledge. The unforeseen encounters will be spurring new insights and fuel an active dialogue on exchange, collaboration and collection. Together, the large group of artists will have to overcome the inhuman proportions of the W139 exhibition space and engage in a spatial relationship with each other’s work, In the rear space Thomas Raat will transform the pattern of the mosaic floor of the Radio Kootwijk building into an enormous mural, making the large back wall an impressive rhythmic backdrop of repetitive ornaments.

Texts by Anne van Oppen and Jean Bernard Koeman

Curated by Jean Bernard Koeman

More Info HERE

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Played By Humans, Scored By Nature. EteRNA, an online game, helps build a new RNA warehouse

August 29, 2012

According to EteRNA: By playing EteRNA, you will participate in creating the first large-scale library of synthetic RNA designs. Your efforts will help reveal new principles for designing RNA-based switches and nanomachines — new systems for seeking and eventually controlling living cells and disease-causing viruses. By interacting with thousands of players and learning from real experimental feedback, you will be pioneering a completely new way to do science. Join the global laboratory!

EteRNA is starting with simple shapes like “the finger” and “the cross” to make sure you can nail the fundamentals. And then we’ll be moving on to elaborate shapes like trees. And then molecules that switch folds when they sense a specific other piece of RNA. This might take a few weeks, or it might take a year — we want to make sure we can ace these exercises.
After that, we will embark on one of a few epic projects – perhaps we’ll make the first RNA random-access memory for a computer. Or switches that enables cells to fluoresce if they start expressing cancer genes. Or how about a nanomotor? Or a nanoLED display? There are lots of options, and we’ll let you propose your own and choose.

Finally, you’ll start seeing a few other kinds of puzzles popping up in later stages: The ability to play with RNAs in three dimensions. The ability to see natural RNAs from bacteria, viruses, and humans; and challenges to predict their properties. Stay tuned.

Play EteRNA

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NEW MUMBAI

July 20, 2012

Tobias Revell, a British interaction designer, has documented the dharavi slums of Mumbai, India, showcasing how genetically modified mushrooms have revitalized the poverty stricken city in the ‘new mumbai’ of the future. Originally from Amsterdam, highly experimental biotechnological samples had been stolen from a dutch lab, where the fungi had been re-engineered to exponentially grow in size for use as narcotics and to create a micro-economy based off the material. As the new plant became introduced into the overpopulated but highly educated urban mass of the slums, the locals began to use it to their advantage – to both exercise freedom from the state and to provide suitable living conditions. Today, the mushroom is used to harvest energy as well as provide providing heat, light and building material for the residents of the slums of Dharavi.”

Text and Image via designboom

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Mimi Lopar: Substandard housing and low-resolution tales

May 14, 2012

“I’m so glad to see (and hear) that little Mimi Lopar finally released her music! She always was a nasty yet adorable myopic thing cycling her way through the favelas at all hours terrorizing and delighting residents with her peculiar, catchy songs. Legend has it if Mimi grants a hug or kiss, she leaves behind a tiny, gooey octagonal hole the recipient’s forehead. Aha – an inlet for her music.” — Panasia Alipia Athenaeum